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How much should I charge for a 1 minute video?

There are no hard- andsoft-limits when it comes to how much you can charge for a 30 second video. The key here is to look for “value.” If you charge $1 for a 30 second video, this is a $1 fee (that is $0.09 per 30 second) if you can capture it. If your video requires multiple takes, such as a 30 second interview, and you charge $60, then that fee is $18 for 10 takes of video. At $18, you are only earning $0.02 per minute. However, when you get to the $24 price point, you are earning $0.15 per minute because the money gained is divided between 10 videos. Again, if your video requires multiple takes, such as a 30 second interview, and you charge $60, then that fee is $18 for 10 takes of video. At $18, you are earning $0.02 per minute.

The New York Times is taking on the White House — again.

A column, headlined “Trump is not my president,” by the veteran reporter David Leonhardt, is raising concerns about Trump’s ability to serve on the nation’s highest court if “the White House continues to lose faith in his moral and mental fitness to serve.” It’s unclear how such a scenario might come to pass.

And Leonhardt is not alone in his concerns.

“All I can say is that the White House should be prepared to fire the person who signed off on the president’s tweets and who apparently doesn’t read the papers the way the rest of us do,” said Charles Krauthammer, a right-leaning political commentator.

At issue is President Trump’s relationship with The Federalist Society, a conservative group founded for ideological purity, and its president, Richard Viguerie, a veteran of the Reagan, George W. Bush and GOP administrations.

The White House is said to have taken steps against Viguerie last year amid a feud over policy on issues including trade, immigration and national security. Viguerie, former chairman of the Heritage Foundation and an outspoken advocate of legal immigration, had the president’s ear over the last six months.

The White House has denied reports that Trump was “tapped” or knew about the report.

In his column, Leonhardt says the president’s “shrewd and impetuous” tweets, his alleged conflict with “the mainstream media,” “his constant tweeting